Grammar School: Using Pique, Peek or Peak

Jun 11

Grammar School: Using Pique, Peek or Peak

 

There is a lot of confusion over the proper use of pique, peek or peak.

These words are often used incorrectly. It’s easy to understand why. Not only do they sound the same, but spell-check would never catch them as long as they are spelled properly. If you first heard the expression “my curiosity was piqued” by hearing it spoken out loud, you may have assumed that the word was peaked.  I have to admit it does make logical sense, as long the speaker was trying to say “my curiosity reached its highest point,” but it’s not the commonly accepted use of the phrase.

The following sentence should clarify the correct use of each word.

Example:  My curiosity was piqued when I peeked out the window and saw a flying saucer hovering above the mountain peak.

Pique means to arouse interest.
Peek means to glance quickly, especially through a small opening.
Peak means the pointed top of a mountain.

Of course, you could avoid the whole pique/peek/peak issue and change that sentence completely to make it a little more exciting.

Example:  I completely freaked out when I looked out and saw that the aliens had come back to kill me.

Which sentence would make you keep on reading?


Once you get your post written, your images in place, and your links tested, take a few extra minutes to double-check the words that you know are sometimes confusing.

Class dismissed!

Grammar School: Using Pique, Peek or Peak

Jun 11

 

There is a lot of confusion over the proper use of pique, peek or peak.

These words are often used incorrectly. It’s easy to understand why. Not only do they sound the same, but spell-check would never catch them as long as they are spelled properly. If you first heard the expression “my curiosity was piqued” by hearing it spoken out loud, you may have assumed that the word was peaked.  I have to admit it does make logical sense, as long the speaker was trying to say “my curiosity reached its highest point,” but it’s not the commonly accepted use of the phrase.

The following sentence should clarify the correct use of each word.

Example:  My curiosity was piqued when I peeked out the window and saw a flying saucer hovering above the mountain peak.

Pique means to arouse interest.
Peek means to glance quickly, especially through a small opening.
Peak means the pointed top of a mountain.

Of course, you could avoid the whole pique/peek/peak issue and change that sentence completely to make it a little more exciting.

Example:  I completely freaked out when I looked out and saw that the aliens had come back to kill me.

Which sentence would make you keep on reading?


Once you get your post written, your images in place, and your links tested, take a few extra minutes to double-check the words that you know are sometimes confusing.

Class dismissed!

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